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Currents

Ecology Law Currents is the online-only publication of Ecology Law Quarterly, one of the nation’s most respected and widely read environmental law journals. Currents features short-form commentary and analysis on timely environmental law and policy issues.

When a Disaster Is Not a “Disaster” and Why that Title Matters for Flint

Helen Marie Berg  Helen Marie Berg is a student at The University of Michigan Law School and is a general member of the Michigan Journal of Environmental & Administrative Law. This post is part of the Environmental Law Review Syndicate. In January 2016, Michigan Governor Rick Snyder appealed to the federal government for a $96

Mar 31, 2016

Rising Seas in the Holy City: Preserving Historic Charleston in the Face of Global Climate Change

Will Grossenbacher Will Grossenbacher is a 3L at the University of Virginia School of Law and is the former Editor-in-Chief of the Virginia Environmental Law Journal. This post is part of the Environmental Law Review Syndicate. From October 2–5, 2015, the State of South Carolina, and the City of Charleston in particular, experienced historic rains:

Mar 27, 2016

Implementing Supplemental Environmental Project Policies to Promote Restorative Justice

Eric Anthony DeBellis Eric DeBellis is a 3L at Berkeley Law, where he is Senior Executive Editor of the Ecology Law Quarterly. This post is part of the Environmental Law Review Syndicate. Introduction The overwhelming majority of environmental enforcement actions settle out of court, but overlooking settlements as merely a mechanical means to save time

Mar 11, 2016

Scalia’s Swan Song: The “Irreconcilability Canon” Resolves the Clean Air Act’s Section 111(d) Drafting Error and Encourages Good Lawmaking

Brenden Cline Brenden Cline is Editor-in-Chief of the Harvard Environmental Law Review. This post is part of the Environmental Law Review Syndicate. [This] is a ‘rare case.’ It is and should be . . . . But every generation or so a case comes along when this Court needs to say enough is enough. —

Mar 10, 2016