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Currents

Ecology Law Currents is the online-only publication of Ecology Law Quarterly, one of the nation’s most respected and widely read environmental law journals. Currents features short-form commentary and analysis on timely environmental law and policy issues.

A Polymer Problem: How Plastic Production and Consumption is Polluting our Oceans

Typically, when a new product comes on the scene, it takes several generations to evaluate its use and environmental impact. However, synthetic plastics really only began to take over around 50 years ago, and we’re already seeing a movement to ban, or at least drastically reduce, the material.

Apr 19, 2019
Abigail Hogan and Alexander Steinbach, Staff Editors, Vermont Journal of Environmental Law

Conduit to Tribal and Environmental Justice? Unpacking Washington v. United States

Popularly referred to by the general public in Washington State as “the culvert case,” Washington v. United States (“Washington V”) has ramifications beyond the removal of barrier culverts precluding safe fish passage. This case brought together several lingering and hotly contested legal issues

Jan 14, 2019
Abigail Hogan and Alexander Steinbach, Staff Editors, Vermont Journal of Environmental Law

A Blooming Problem: How Florida Could Address the Causes and Effects of Red Tide

Florida’s southwest coast, once a haven to wildlife and tourists alike, is experiencing one of the worst red tides in recent memory. Red tides, harmful algae blooms (“HABs”) which often have a red hue which affect both inland and coastal waterways, are common occurrences in Florida

Nov 27, 2018
Abigail Hogan and Alexander Steinbach, Staff Editors, Vermont Journal of Environmental Law

State and Local Control of Federal Lands: New Developments in the Transfer of Federal Lands Movement

The history of federal public lands is one of national interests, not those of any particular state or county government. It was the federal government, not western states, that acquired these lands through “purchase or conquest.” After an early period of federal land sales and disposals, much of the public lands

Aug 21, 2018
Abigail Hogan and Alexander Steinbach, Staff Editors, Vermont Journal of Environmental Law